Quarry Field Conservation Task

A sunny, busy day with many out for their daily constitutional Next, some scrub-bashing – removal of encroaching elm suckers. Before … And after … The meadow restored All the better for wild-flowers Well done folks Advertisements

Waxcaps at Bradlaugh Fields

These pretty fungi are increasingly rare to find nowadays, because their habitat is “unimproved” grassland, ie grassland that hasn’t had fertilisers tipped all over it. The Waxcap Conservation website says: Waxcaps need short turf (i.e. regularly mown or grazed), no fertiliser or lime input and no disturbance, e.g. ploughing or reseeding … To conserve Lawn […]

Wildflowers of Bradlaugh Fields #61 Small Scabious

Small Scabious flourishes especially well in the dry, bare stony soil of the Hills and Hollows where the topsoil was scraped away to give wild-flowers a chance against the aggressive grasses that otherwise dominate where there is no grazing or mowing to remove nutrients. The attractive powder-blue flowers are lightly sweet-scented and a real magnet […]

Wildflowers of Bradlaugh Fields #54 Dyer’s Rocket, Greenweed or Weld

Rocket is an appropriate name for this plant, which shoots up from a low rosette of shiny green leaves in early Spring to a greenish-yellow flower-spike as much as 6 feet tall by its June or July flowering time; as seen pioneering here on the newly excavated Blisworth limestone next to Holton’s Lane ancient hedgerow […]

Bradlaugh Fields in the Northamptonshire Natural History Society Newsletter

In a combined meeting on Sunday 14th June over thirty NNHS Botanical Section members and various local friends of Bradlaugh Fields came to hear the University of Northampton’s Professor of Biodiversity Jeff Ollerton give us an insight into bees, flowers, pollination and the natural history of the Quarry Field and the unfortunately mis-named Scrub Field […]